Our 140-year-old brick farm house sits on property that is known for its natural springs. In at least three distinct spots on our hundred acres, water bubbles up at will. Our spring-fed pond is freezing cold year-round, but rarely freezes over in winter because of the springs supplying a constant flow of fresh water.

And yet, some years ago, a well that had serviced past owners of our home suddenly dried up. A well that was surrounded by water failed to produce because it was not tapped into the veins running elsewhere on hillsides and in the barnyard where water was in plentiful supply. To get the water we needed for our household, we had to start over and dig deeper to find a new source.

I’ve experienced my own “dry well” in recent months. Thirsty for inspiration as I returned to writing projects I’d let lie fallow for too long, I came up with nothing. Words were flowing through my journals and in my prayer life, but when I needed them so I could continue with work I’d begun long ago, I had none.

That’s when I knew it was time to start over and dig deeper. The old source for inspiration had dried up. Ideas that held promise in another season were like sand in my mouth. Their time had passed and I’ve had to accept that it’s time to turn the page and begin again.

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I’m writing for five quick minutes (more or less) on the one-word prompt “well” and linking up with other bloggers at Five Minute Friday.

My Top Summer Fiction Recommendation

I’m continuing with my summer focus on friendship, feasts, fiction and film by recommending this book by a friend whose writing well has definitely NOT run dry. Susie Finkbeiner just released her sixth novel, a beautiful story set in 1967 during the height of the Vietnam War. All Manner of Things captured me from the start and was a book that kept me up nights. The Jacobsen family quickly became a family I cared deeply about. Susie’s ability to create believable characters and a compelling story line held my attention to the last page. Slight spoiler: I read the ending with tissues in hand.

If you read just one work of fiction this summer, you can’t go wrong with All Manner of Things. You’ll come away with a deeper understanding of this era and of the war that divided our nation. And, your heart will be changed by the family that found one another again.

Susie has promoted her lovely book with her signature sense of humor. I’m sure she won’t mind if I share a bit of it with you.

Source: Author Susie Finkbeiner